Love, Anger, Madness is a beautifully written trilogy of short stories that examine life under the brutal Haitian regime in the mid-1900s. My Haitian history is fuzzy, but like most put-upon proletariats, Vieux-Chauvet is out to talk about repression, depression, and other bleak aspects but in a lyrical and engrossing way.

And I usually don't like short stories, too. Although, I think each story, Love, Anger and Madness is more individual novellas that examine a different aspect. Although there are some similarities between the stories, the characters comes from affluent or educated classes. They are not white; Vieux-Chavet explores the black or mulatto Haitians. They formerly held prestige but no longer hold it now. They are watching whatever there lives were unravel into not happy things.

The first story is "Love" and that's about three sisters, particularly the eldest who is a spinster. That one....I actually think ends kind of happy. Or a little triumphant...but not really. That was probably my favorite.

The second story, "Anger," is really about anger. A family is going to loose their land, so the daughter agrees to sleeping with the man in power. The anger and helplessness and stifled emotions that engulf the household is.... This story upset me so much actually that I couldn't read the rest of the book for a few weeks.

The third story, "Madness," follows the poet Rene as he is trapped in a house without food for days. It's interesting how the poets seem to be singled out for persecution. It goes to show how the educated, no matter their specialty, are dangerous to those in power. This story breaks it's structure; it's written in two parts. It ends badly, like the others, but I think Vieux-Chavet is showing how there is no hope at the bottom of the box. The reality of Haitian life at the time is such that the scars are permanent and deep.

This was a very interesting read. I recommend it for those who want to take a step into international waters. zcLove, Anger, Madness is a beautifully written trilogy of short stories that examine life under the brutal Haitian regime in the mid-1900s. My Haitian history is fuzzy, but like most put-upon proletariats, Vieux-Chauvet is out to talk about repression, depression, and other bleak aspects but in a lyrical and engrossing way.

And I usually don't like short stories, too. Although, I think each story, Love, Anger and Madness is more individual novellas that examine a different aspect. Although there are some similarities between the stories, the characters comes from affluent or educated classes. They are not white; Vieux-Chavet explores the black or mulatto Haitians. They formerly held prestige but no longer hold it now. They are watching whatever there lives were unravel into not happy things.

The first story is "Love" and that's about three sisters, particularly the eldest who is a spinster. That one....I actually think ends kind of happy. Or a little triumphant...but not really. That was probably my favorite.

The second story, "Anger," is really about anger. A family is going to loose their land, so the daughter agrees to sleeping with the man in power. The anger and helplessness and stifled emotions that engulf the household is.... This story upset me so much actually that I couldn't read the rest of the book for a few weeks.

The third story, "Madness," follows the poet Rene as he is trapped in a house without food for days. It's interesting how the poets seem to be singled out for persecution. It goes to show how the educated, no matter their specialty, are dangerous to those in power. This story breaks it's structure; it's written in two parts. It ends badly, like the others, but I think Vieux-Chavet is showing how there is no hope at the bottom of the box. The reality of Haitian life at the time is such that the scars are permanent and deep.

This was a very interesting read. I recommend it for those who want to take a step into international waters.